Pine Ridge Mission Trip 2015 – Background

My daughter Stacey and I are planning to go on a short-term mission trip to Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in NSM2015LOGOretinasouthwest South Dakota this August. The trip will be with about 20 other people from my church, Fairfield First Baptist, and is through Next Step Ministries. This is the first in a series of blogs I’ll be writing about the trip.

Pine Ridge Reservation is home to the Oglala Lakota tribe, and located in Oglala Lakota County (formerly Shannon County), South Dakota, which is the poorest county in the United States. Some statistics:

  • Pine Ridge has 8 times the United States rate of diabetes.
  • The alcoholism rate is estimated as high as 80%.
  • The median income on the Pine Ridge Reservation is approximately $2,600 to $3,500 per year.
  • The unemployment rate on Pine Ridge is approximately 83-85%, and can be higher during the winter months.
  • About 97% of the population lives below Federal poverty levels.
  • 1 in 4 infants is born with fetal alcohol syndrome or effects.
  • The suicide rate is more than twice the national rate.
  • Teen suicides occur at a rate of 4 times the national rate.
  • School drop-out rate is over 70%.
  • Teacher turnover is 800% that of the U.S. national average.
  • Infant mortality is three times the national rate.
  • Life expectancy on Pine Ridge is the lowest in the United States and the 2nd lowest in the Western Hemisphere. Only Haiti has a lower rate.
  • There are an estimated average of 17 people living in each family home (a home which may only have two to three rooms).  Some larger homes, built for 6 to 8 people, have up to 30 people living in them.
  • Over-all, 59% of the Reservation homes are substandard.
  • Over 33% of the Reservation homes lack basic water and sewage systems.
  • 39% of the homes on the Pine Ridge Reservation have no electricity.
  • At least 4,000 new homes are needed on the Reservation in order to combat the homeless situation.

History

LakotaThe Oglala are one of the seven subtribes of the Lakota tribe, who along with the Nakota and Dakota, comprise the Great Sioux Nation. Prior to the Lewis and Clark Expedition of 1804–1806, the Lakota had little contact with non-indigenous people, other than a few traders. At one time, the Lakota controlled a vast area of the Great Plains, including parts of Nebraska, North and South Dakota, Wyoming, and Montana.

In 1851, the United States government negotiated the first Fort Laramie Treaty with the Lakota and several other tribes in order to secure the safety of travelers on the Oregon Trail. The Indians were to receive an annuity in the amount of fifty thousand dollars for fifty years. The U.S. Senate promptly adjusted the compensation from fifty to ten years, then failed to actually deliver most of the commodities promised as payment, and did not enforce other treaty provisions.

In response, the Lakota and others attacked settlers, causing public pressure on the US Army to punish them. A series of battles between the Lakota and the U.S. Army followed.

The 1868 Treaty of Fort Laramie ended this war. The treaty established the Great Sioux Reservation, which comprised the entire western half of South Dakota, including the Black Hills. The Black Hills were (and are still) considered sacred by the Lakota. The treaty provided for hunting privileges in areas of Nebraska, Wyoming, Montana, and North Dakota until the buffalo were gone, as well as for schools, clothing, blankets, and food rations. It also called for land allotments to be made to individual Indians.

SiouxreservationmapWhen gold was discovered in the Black Hills in 1872, the U.S. government refused to enforce provisions of the 1868 treaty keeping miners out.

Despite the fact that the 1868 treaty required that ¾ of all adult Lakota males had to approve any land deals, and that the Lakota overwhelmingly refused to sign the new treaty, the U.S. Congress ratified Indian Appropriations Act of 1876, which cut off all rations for the Lakota until they ceded the Black Hills to the United States, effectively stealing the Black Hills from the Lakota.

The government also began the systematic destruction of the buffalo herds that the Lakota relied on for food and shelter. This forced the Lakota onto the reservations in order to receive food allotments, or to starve. Once on the reservations, the government again ignored treaty provisions by reducing food allotments, causing widespread illness and death due to malnutrition.

The Dawes Act of 1887 forced the Lakota to divide the Reservation land into allotments for individual Indians, and to sell off “excess” lands to white settlers. It was designed to force the Lakota to become “civilized” by becoming farmers and abandoning traditional tribal structures and traditions. However, because the land was unsuitable for farming, and due to severe drought, the Lakota were reduced to near starvation.

In 1890, in part due to the desperation of the Lakota people, a religious movement known as the Ghost Dance arose. It was believed that the dance would reunite the Lakota with spirits of their dead ancestors, make the whites leave, and bring unity, prosperity, and peace. Unfortunately, many white settlers felt threatened by the movement, fearing it would lead to a new round of war with the Indians. The military was called in. On December 15, 1890, 40 Indian policemen tried to arrest Chief Sitting Bull, a supporter of the Ghost Dance, killing him in the process. After Sitting Bull’s death, about 200 members of his followers, fled and joined Chief Spotted Elk, and attempted to travel to Pine Ridge for protection. On the way, they were met by a 7th Cavalry detachment under Major Samuel M. Whitside. On December 29, 1890, while camped next to Wounded Knee Creek, the military attempted to disarm the Indians. After a scuffle, a shot was fired, then the military opened fire on the Indians. A massacre ensued. In less than an hour, at least 150 Lakota men, women, and children had been killed, and many more wounded. Some estimates put the total casualties (dead and wounded) at around 300 of the approximately 350 Indians in Spotted Elk’s group. Many of the women and children fled into a nearby ravine, where they were systematically hunted down and shot. The Wounded Knee Massacre effectively ended all Lakota hopes of a return to the pre-reservation way of life.

Religion on Pine Ridge Reservation

Approximately 46% of the residents on Pine Ridge Reservation are affiliated with a religious congregation. Nearly half of those are affiliated with the Catholic Church, and a little over a quarter are affiliated with the Episcopal Church. The rest are spread between various evangelical churches, mainline Protestant churches, and a smattering of others.

The Oglala Lakota are very spiritual people. Although not affiliated with a church, most hold to some variation of traditional Lakota beliefs, and many affiliated with churches combine some traditional beliefs with their Christian beliefs.

According to Lakota tradition, the Lakota were given their culture by a sacred person, the White Buffalo Calf Woman, who gave the people the sacred pipe along with a promise to teach them the ceremonies and standards for living as a united tribe. This pipe links the Lakota to their relatives the buffalo, who would give their very lives to sustain their kin.

The Lakota language has no word for religion. The sacred are not restricted to certain times, places, or activities – the Lakota held and many continue to hold that all is sacred. Religious revelation through personal quest, dreams, and visions remains an important part of their dynamic belief system. Lakota religion teaches that everything has a spirit, and many Lakota worship the spirits. The Great Spirit is the most powerful of all – the traditional Lakota God.

There are many Christian organizations that do mission work on Pine Ridge. Most center around building projects and other ways of trying to improve the living conditions on the Reservation. Many of the Oglala appreciate the work these groups do, but many others have a deep opposition to Christianity and Christians. Many feel they have been stripped of everything they once had, and that their traditional religious beliefs are all they have left. Others resent that religion, especially Catholic and Episcopalian churches, was shoved down their throats in the deliberate attempts to “civilize” them by forcing them to give up their traditional ways.

Why this matters

Pine RidgeBecause I will be spending a week in August on the Pine Ridge Reservation as a missionary, I felt it was critical that I learn as much as possible about the people I will be ministering to. The Gospel isn’t about changing culture; it’s about introducing people to Jesus Christ. Part of evangelism involves understanding the people being evangelized in order to be able to present the Gospel message in a relevant way. The message doesn’t change, but how it’s presented must be tailored to fit the understanding of those with whom it’s being shared. Part of always being ready to give a defense of the Gospel to everyone who asks us about it (1 Peter 3:15) is to anticipate the probable objections to the Gospel that a particular group might raise, and to prepare Biblically-solid answers.

In Lakota culture, one must earn the right to be heard. The way to earn that right is by building relationships, and relationships are built through understanding and trust. At this point, my goals for the trip are: 1) help improve someone’s life through building projects; 2) build relationships through service and friendship; and 3) when given the opportunity to be heard, present the Gospel in a way that it can be understood and received. My hope is that the preparation, study, and prayer I have undertaken will allow me to have an impact on someone’s life with the Gospel.

There is great spiritual warfare on the Reservation. The worship of spirits opens the door to demonic activity. Many of the suicides at Pine Ridge have been directly attributed to bad “spirits” telling people to kill themselves. Please pray for the Lakota people on Pine Ridge Reservation, and for the Christians (both natives and non-natives) working to spread the Gospel and improve living conditions.

The righteous will answer Him, saying, “Lord, when did we see You hungry and feed You, or thirsty and give You drink? When did we see You a stranger and take You in, or naked and clothe You? Or when did we see You sick, or in prison, and come to You?” And the King will answer and say to them, “Assuredly, I say to you, inasmuch as you did it to one of the least of these My brethren, you did it to Me.”

2014 Mission Trips

Hope in a World of Brokenness

Stacey and Joey Wendling Mission Trips

Monterrey, Mexico – June 2014

Pine Ridge Reservation, South Dakota – August 2014

Greetings from Fairfield, Ohio!

The reason we are writing to you is that we have the opportunity next summer to join with our church, Fairfield First Baptist, to provide hope in a world of brokenness by going on mission trips to Monterrey, Mexico and Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota.

In June 2014, Joey and Stacey once again have the opportunity to serve the children in orphanages near Monterrey, Mexico. Our church is partnering with Back2Back Ministries to serve the children in 10 Christian Casa Hogar’s (Children’s Homes), and two churches in the Rio and Cadereyta communities. Each Children’s Home has 30 to 100 children ranging in ages from 10 months to 17 years. These children come to the homes from a variety of backgrounds – neglect, abuse, abandonment, and in some cases, economic inability of the parents to provide for them. Whatever the reason, each child is truly a gift from God. It is our hope that each child would have a personal relationship with Jesus Christ, and have opportunities for a productive and meaningful life. Our efforts will include:

  • Construction work to improve the facilities, programs, and living conditions
  • Sorting and preparing donations for the daily distribution to the children’s homes
  • Sharing the Gospel of Jesus Christ though interaction and relationship building

Stacey Wendling

In August, Stacey will have the opportunity for a second mission trip before she heads off to Liberty University, this time to the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Pine Ridge is an Oglala Lakota Native American reservation, and is one of the poorest communities in the United States. The poverty on Pine Ridge is devastating. It is common to find homes overcrowded, as those with homes take in whoever needs a roof over their heads. Many homes are without running water or sewer, adequate heating or air conditioning, and have black mold. The unemployment rate is about 80-90%, with a per capita income of around $4,000. Life expectancy on Pine Ridge is the lowest in the United States and the second lowest in the Western Hemisphere, behind only Haiti. Alcoholism and suicide are the leading causes of death.

Stacey and our church will be working with Next Step Ministries to serve in the Pine Ridge community to help rebuild the reservation and restore the hope and beauty buried deep among the brokenness found here. We will have the opportunity to serve in a number of ways, working with families and their children, meeting residents on a daily basis, restoring and building upon relationships with community members, rebuilding homes, churches, or trailers, roofing, drywall, and painting. Throughout this week, we will be acting as the hands and feet of our Lord to serve this community in a valuable way. It is exciting to think that Stacey can be a small part of that!

Joey Wendling

We are writing to you because we will by relying on friends and family for support as we prepare for the trip and while we are gone. Between the three trips, we need to raise nearly $3000 for trip expenses.

First and foremost, we ask for your prayers. Please pray for the orphans in Monterrey, the workers in their Children’s Homes, and for the people donating time out of their summers to take trips to Mexico to work to improve the children’s lives. Pray for the Oglala Lakota people of Pine Ridge Reservation, that they would have hope, and pray for those who are working to bring them hope. Please also pray for Stacey and Joey, that they would be able to raise the funds necessary, and that God would be preparing them for the work He has planned for them.

Secondly, if you are able, we would greatly appreciate any financial support you might be able to provide. We need to raise nearly $3000 for the three trips. Gifts are tax deductible, and checks should be made payable to Fairfield First Baptist Church, with Stacey/Joey Wendling Mission Trips in the memo line.

Children in a Monterrey Children’s Home

We are so privileged to be able to tell these broken communities that there is a greater life they can live, and a greater love they can experience. That a life with Jesus can bring real fulfillment, purpose, and healing to the wounds they feel. We hope you also feel privileged to be a partner in a mission going after lost and broken people with a message of hope, as Jesus told his disciples, “I have told you these things so that in me you may have peace. In this world you will have trouble. But take heart! I have overcome the world” John 16:33



Should you feel called to give in support of the missions effort in Mexico and South Dakota through giving to Stacey and Joey Wendling, please fill out, cut off, and return to the address below.

Gifts are tax-deductible. Please make checks payable to Fairfield First Baptist Church.

Name: ______________________________________

Email: _______________________________________

Phone: ___________________________ (home or cell)

*Please mail to:

Fairfield First Baptist Church

1072 Hicks Blvd.

Fairfield, OH 45014

Attn: Stacey/Joey Wendling Mission Trips

Mexico Mission Trip – Report

Today’s blog is by a guest blogger, my daughter Stacey.


This summer, my brother Joey and I went to Mexico for the first time. I had never been out of the country before, so I was very excited. I was also afraid, because I speak very little Spanish.

The first day was mostly traveling and unpacking at the compound we stayed at. We called it “the compound”, but it was more like a campus. There were several buildings which housed some of the staff, and a main building where interns and groups like ours stayed. We could see huge mountains in every direction. They were really pretty in the morning, when the sunrise was behind them and clouds seemed to rest on top of the peaks. The mountains were one of my favorite parts.

The second day was more eventful. After eating breakfast, we visited a children’s home called Casa Hogar Douglas. Since it was Sunday, we got to see the church there. It was cool to listen to so many people worshipping in Spanish. When the service started, we left and cooked chicken burgers for the children at the home. They ate with us, and we played with them for a while. Some of us went down to the library and cleaned it. There are very few libraries in Mexico. Many of the children can’t read when they arrive at children’s homes, so the staff built this library so they could learn and enjoy books the same way we do in America.

I became friends with a little boy named Roberto. He liked to watch the girls paint each other’s nails, and decided he wanted to try. One of the staff let him paint hers. After the first one, he left. We were kind of confused. He came back with water and a napkin. Apparently, he didn’t like how it had turned out and wanted to start over! This time, he painted all of the girl’s nails. We were all amazed at how good at it he was. If he had the opportunity, he could do it for a living.

On the third day, we came back to Casa Hogar Douglas. This time, another girl and I played jump rope with some of the kids. They were really good at it, especially the boys. I learned how to count a little in Spanish. One of the little girls was trying to be like us and kept asking my brother, “Do you want a piece of me?” He said “yes”, so she beat him up. He was fine, she was only five.

It was hard for us to leave, because we weren’t coming back the next day. Some of the kids started crying, and some wouldn’t stop hugging us. It was good to know that we had made a difference to them, even though it was sad when we left.

My favorite day was the fourth. We went to Rio 3, which was what the staff called the area. Basically, it was a community by a river. The people living there literally had nothing. They had built their houses out of whatever they could find, like fences or pieces of old buildings. We served a lunch at the church there, and passed out the leftovers to people in the community. Then we gathered all of the kids we could, and played games. One of the staff read them a story called Tu es Especial (you are special). I didn’t understand the words, but I realized later that I had read the book in English a long time ago, when I was little.

During the story, a girl about eleven or twelve sat down next to me. When the story was over, the kids colored a picture of a ribbon that said (in Spanish, of course) “thank you for making me special”. I watched the girl color and we talked, I with my limited Spanish, and she with her limited English. She told me that her name was Vero, and that there was a fruit tree near her house. When she was done coloring, she showed me her picture and held it out to me, saying “tu”. You. She wanted me to take her picture. The point of coloring it was for her to understand how special she is, so I didn’t let her give it to me. She looked disappointed, and walked away. When it was time to go, I headed towards the bus. Suddenly Vero was there, with a big smile on her face. She handed me a piece of paper and hugged me. I looked at the paper, and it said, “thank you for making me special”. I was confused. Why was it so important to her that I have that paper? She looked up at me and grinned, and then I understood. Vero knew how special she was. Now she wanted to make sure I knew how special I was. This little girl, who had almost nothing, was more concerned with making sure that the people around her knew that they were loved, that they were not worthless.

I understand now the needs of these people. Yes, they need food and shelter. But more than that, they need love. They need someone to care about them. They need someone to share the love of Jesus Christ with them. I think people don’t understand this. They send money, clothes, and food, and there’s plenty of it. But how many are willing to send themselves? How many of us are willing to go and be with the orphans, the poor, the homeless?

The organization we went through, Back2Back, works to meet all of the needs of people like the ones we met, in Mexico, Nigeria, India, and Haiti. They have come up with five categories of needs: physical, social, educational, emotional, and spiritual. Why is it that we are so eager to meet only the physical needs? These people are just like us, they need friends, family, education, love, and especially God. I encourage you to pray about this. Why not go to a homeless shelter or food bank near you? I know that it’s awkward to socialize with people you’ve never met, but it’s worth it.

The fifth day went quickly. We worked at a children’s home that’s still being build. In one of the rooms we were painted, I discovered enormous moths, easily as big as my hand. Since I was apparently the only one there not afraid of insects, I had to chase them out. It wasn’t fun. Imagine standing on a ladder while bugs the size of bats fly at your face. That’s what it was like. When we got back to the compound, I had to chase a two inch long flying cockroach out of the girls’ room. That was also interesting.

On day six, we took a field trip with another children’s home to a park. It was incredibly hot. We played a version of tag, and spent most of the time running around. When it was time for lunch, we sat under the three tiny trees in the park. Unfortunately, several hundred fire ants had beaten us to the shade and they bit everyone. Despite the ants, it was fun.

After the field trip, we went back to the children’s home and hung out with the kids. A few of us walked around and prayed over different parts of the home. We met some of the older girls and talked with them. We found out that one of the oldest ones had been accepted into the Hope program.

In Mexico, education only goes up to 9th grade, and when you turn sixteen, you have to leave the children’s home you live at. Most of these kids don’t have enough education to get a job, so they turn to drugs or prostitution to support themselves. Back2Back created the Hope program to give the kids a chance at a better life. Kids who are accepted move to the compound I stayed at and live with some of the staff. There are about forty kids living there, ranging from 10th graders to college students. They all have jobs to help pay for their education, but a lot of their tuition is paid for with donations. Some of the kids are also sponsored by Americans. The sponsors pay $100 a month per child, and write to them four times a year. Some of the people on our team decided to sponsor a child.

The last day, day seven, was mostly travel. While it’s good to be home, I miss those kids I met. I want to go on another mission trip, either to Mexico or another country. This trip has changed me for the better. I’ve made a commitment to be more involved with the ministries in my community, to meet the physical, social, educational, emotional, and spiritual needs of the people in Fairfield.

If you have never been on a mission trip, I encourage you to go. We in America have been given so much. The average person here lives on more than $100 per day. Over 40% of the world’s population lives on $2 a day. We have the resources to make a difference in so many people’s lives. I ask you to pray about it. I also encourage you to read a book, Helping Without Hurting. It’s a good guide for those who aren’t sure how to meet the social, emotional, and spiritual needs of people in need.

I have had an amazing experience, but it wouldn’t have been possible without help. Thank you to those of you who helped Joey and me raise enough money to go to Mexico and help so many people. The money you’ve given helped improve the living condition of a child. They appreciate everything you’ve made possible.

I can honestly say that this has been the most incredible experience in my life. After praying about it for a long time, I know that I am meant to be involved in ministry. I don’t know yet if it will be a career, or if it’s just something to do when I can, but I will do whatever the Lord tells me. It’s not hard. You just have to be willing to do it. Paul instructs us to minister “For there is no distinction between Jew and Greek; the same Lord is Lord of all, bestowing his riches on all who call on him. For ‘everyone who calls on the name of the Lord will be saved.’ But how are they to call on him in whom they have not believed? And how are they to believe in him of whom they have never heard? And how are they to hear without someone preaching? And how are they to preach unless they are sent? As it is written, ‘How beautiful are the feet of those who preach the good news!'” (Romans 10: 12-15) Paul is sending us. It’s up to us to preach so people can hear and believe.

I know, you feel like you can’t make a difference. Here’s a story I heard in Mexico: a man walks along the shore of an ocean. He sees a boy picking up something and throwing it back into the ocean. He walks up to the boy and asks, “What are you doing?” The boy replies, “Throwing starfish back into the water. The tide washes them up, and if I don’t throw them back they’ll die.” The man says, “Look, there are miles of beach and thousands of starfish. You can’t possibly make a difference.” The boy listens politely, then picks up another starfish and throws it into the water. “Well,” he says, “it makes a difference to that one.” Yes, you can’t help everyone. So just concentrate on helping one person at a time. That one person will thank you. And so will God.

Stacey Wendling

Mexico Mission Trip Update – FULLY FUNDED!

Thanks to the grace of God, and the numerous fundraising events and generous donations, Stacey and Joey’s mission trips to Mexico are FULLY FUNDED!

From June 2nd – 8th, 2012, my daughter Stacey and son Joey will be joining 19 others from our home church, Fairfield First Baptist, to provide hope in a world of brokenness to the children in orphanages near Monterrey, Mexico. The mission trip will be serving the children in 10 Christian Casa Hogar’s (Children’s Homes), and two churches in the Rio and Cadereyta communities. Each Children’s Home has 30 to 100 children ranging in ages from 10 months to 17 years. These children come to the homes from a variety of backgrounds – neglect, abuse, abandonment, and in some cases, economic inability of the parents to provide for them. Whatever the reason, each child is truly a gift from God. It is our hope that each child would have a personal relationship with Jesus Christ, and have opportunities for a productive and meaningful life.

Their efforts will include:

  • Construction work to improve the facilities, programs, and living conditions
  • Sorting and preparing donations for the daily distribution to the children’s homes
  • Sharing the Gospel of Jesus Christ though interaction and relationship building

The group will be so privileged to be able to tell this broken community that there is a greater life they can live, and a greater love they can experience. That a life with Jesus can bring real fulfillment, purpose, and healing to the wounds they feel. We greatly appreciate those of you who chose to be a partner in this mission of going after lost and broken kids with a message of hope, as Jesus told his disciples, “I have told you these things so that in me you may have peace. In this world you will have trouble. But take heart! I have overcome the world” John 16:33

Please pray for Stacey, Joey, and the others from Fairfield traveling on this trip.  Pray that the Holy Spirit works through each member of the team to reach children for Christ.  Pray for the team’s safety, and that God will use this experience to bring each person on the trip to a closer walk with Him.

Mexico Mission Trip Update – April 9, 2012

Here’s the latest update on our fund-raising efforts for Stacey’s and Joey’s mission trip to Monterey, Mexico.

We’ve raised $1,344 toward the trip; we still need to raise another $884.  We‘re currently selling Little Caesar’s coupon booklets for $5.  The youth group will be having a rummage sale/car wash on May 19th.  There are some other fund raisers in the works, but the bottom line is, we could really use a few more donations.

From June 2nd – 8th, 2012, Joey and Stacey have the opportunity to join our church, Fairfield First Baptist, on a mission trip to orphanages near Monterrey, Mexico.  The team will be serving the children in 10 Christian Casa Hogar’s (Children’s Homes), and two churches in the Rio and Cadereyta communities.

Joey

Joey

Stacey

*

*

The cost is $1,114 each for them to be able to go.
*

*

*

Their efforts will include:

  • Construction work to improve the facilities, programs, and living conditions
  • Sorting and preparing donations for the daily distribution to the children’s homes
  • Sharing the Gospel of Jesus Christ though interaction and relationship building

For more information about the trip and how you can support Stacey and Joey, you can download the flier from my website: http://www.web-ling.com/mexico.rtf.  Even if you aren’t able to make a donation, we covet your prayers, both for the fundraising, as well as for the trip itself.

If you’d like to make a donation, send a check payable to:

Fairfield First Baptist Church

Attn:  Mission Trip

1072 Hicks Blvd.

Fairfield, OH 45014

 Please enclose a note that the money is for Stacey and Joey Wendling.

Thank you for your prayer and support!

Fairfield First Baptist Church is partnering with Back 2 Back Ministries for this mission trip.

Back 2 Back Ministries

Back 2 Back Ministries

Mexico Mission Trip Update – March 7, 2012

Joey

Here’s the latest update on our fund-raising efforts for Stacey’s and Joey’s mission trip to Monterey, Mexico.

Thanks to three very generous gifts, and selling 55 pies, we’ve raised over half of the money we need!

However, we still need to raise several hundred dollars more.

From June 2nd – 8th, 2012, Joey and Stacey have the opportunity to join our church, Fairfield First Baptist, on a mission trip to orphanages near Monterrey, Mexico.  The team will be serving the children in 10 Christian Casa Hogar’s (Children’s Homes), and two churches in the Rio and Cadereyta communities.

Stacey

The cost is just over $1,100 each for them to be able to go.

Their efforts will include:

  • Construction work to improve the facilities, programs, and living conditions
  • Sorting and preparing donations for the daily distribution to the children’s homes
  • Sharing the Gospel of Jesus Christ though interaction and relationship building

For more information about the trip and how you can support Stacey and Joey, you can download the flier from my website: http://www.web-ling.com/mexico.rtf.  Even if you aren’t able to make a donation, we covet your prayers, both for the fundraising, as well as for the trip itself.

If you’d like to make a donation, send a check payable to:

Fairfield First Baptist Church

Attn:  Mission Trip

1072 Hicks Blvd.

Fairfield, OH 45014

 Please enclose a note that the money is for Stacey and Joey Wendling.

Thank you for your prayer and support!

Fairfield First Baptist Church is partnering with Back 2 Back Ministries for this mission trip.

Back 2 Back Ministries

Back 2 Back Ministries

I’M SENDING MY CHILDREN TO A MEXICAN ORPHANAGE!

OK, now that I have your attention…

Here’s the latest update on our fund-raising efforts for Stacey’s and Joey’s mission trip to Monterey, Mexico.

Joey

Joey

Thanks to a couple of very generous gifts, and brisk pie sales, we’re off to a great start!

From June 2nd – 8th, 2012, Joey and Stacey have the opportunity to join our church, Fairfield First Baptist, on a mission trip to orphanages near Monterrey, Mexico.  The team will be serving the children in 10 Christian Casa Hogar’s (Children’s Homes), and two churches in the Rio and Cadereyta communities.

Their efforts will include:

Stacey

Stacey

  • Construction work to improve the facilities, programs, and living conditions
  • Sorting and preparing donations for the daily distribution to the children’s homes
  • Sharing the Gospel of Jesus Christ though interaction and relationship building

The cost is approximately $1,100 each for them to be able to go.

For more information about the trip and how you can support Stacey and Joey, you can download the flier from my website: http://www.web-ling.com/mexico.rtf.  Even if you aren’t able to make a donation, we covet your prayers, both for the fundraising, as well as for the trip itself.

Orphans

Orphans

If you’d like to make a donation, send a check payable to:

Fairfield First Baptist Church

Attn:  Mission Trip

1072 Hicks Blvd.

Fairfield, OH 45014

 Please enclose a note that the money is for Stacey and Joey Wendling.

Thank you for your prayer and support!

Fairfield First Baptist Church is partnering with Back 2 Back Ministries for this mission trip.

Back 2 Back Ministries

Back 2 Back Ministries