Pine Ridge Mission Trip 2015 – Day 3

Wednesday, August 5 marked the midpoint of our stay at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation.

Water tower at Pine Ridge

Water tower at Pine Ridge

We woke up to the water being out for most of the complex where we were staying. Fortunately, we had water in the building where I slept. Breakfast was a little slim, since the water was out in the kitchen, and it was the last week of trips for the summer. I had a couple of bagels, although one of them had a little mold on it. I started to complain, but then thought about how what I had for breakfast was more than a lot of the people who lived on the Rez had to eat that morning. So, I pulled the moldy spot off, and ate the rest.

On the way to the work site, we once again stopped at Higher Ground for coffee and muffins.

On the work site at Candy’s house, we were rather behind schedule for being able to complete the work by week’s end. Fortunately, one of the crews from South Carolina had completed their project on Tuesday, and and were able to join us. The SC group started tackling the end of the trailer with all the rotting framing. The Fairfield group continued with siding, soffet, trim around the windows and doors, and painting. Fortunately, Next Step was able to get more ladders and a small scaffold to the site – the lack of ladders had been the biggest factor slowing us down. The work began progressing more quickly!

Unlike yesterday, when there had been clouds and a strong breeze, today was very hot and windless. Unfortunately, most of the remaining work was on the sunny sides of the house, and there is little shade in the yard. I chugged through a large coffee, 2 Monsters, 2 bottles of water, two Gaterades, and was still thirsty.

Me, nailing up Hardie Board

Me, nailing up Hardie Board

One of the things Next Step requested was that each group bring tools from home, to supplement the tools they provided. We had been given a list of requested tools to bring. I brought my cordless drill and circular saw, which were on the list. I also grabbed several tools that weren’t on the list, following the Boy Scout motto, “Be Prepared.” Among those were a jigsaw, extra drill bits, extra saw blades, and extra work gloves. Today, we used all of these.

During a break, I walked over to talk with Wilbert Jr. again. I told him that the guy from Next Step in charge of materials said we might be able to leave extra materials, but he had to check to see if he was still within budget, and get approval. Hopeful, but no promises.

That evening, our group brought Subway sandwiches to Lakota veterans living in a veterans home in Pine Ridge. We had a chance to sit down with Denver American Horse, Veterans Service Officer for Oglala Lakota County, who runs the shelter. Denver is a fascinating man, whom I would love to sit down with one-on-one and simply listen.

Denver American Horse

Denver American Horse

Denver spoke of the Lakota tradition as a warrior people. In the old days, the Lakota were fierce warriors, whom the other Plains tribes didn’t mess with very much. They were also among the last to give up their way of life and move to the reservations. Names like Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse, and Red Cloud are but a few of the more famous Lakota warriors. In more recent times, many Lakota continue the warrior tradition by serving in the United States military. Denver told the story of a man in nearby Martin, SD, who had both of his sons drafted during the Viet Nam war. He complained to the draft board, “I need my two sons to run my ranch. Why don’t you draft a few of those lazy Lakota Indians instead?” The officer from the draft board replied, “We can’t. They’ve all already volunteered.”

One of the things I’ve heard is that many Lakota resent outsiders doing work on the reservation, especially churches. I asked Denver whether he thought groups like ours, coming from outside the reservation to do various projects on mission trips, were actually doing any good on the reservation. He said, yes, what we were doing definitely helped. I then asked him what else we could do, besides these sorts of short-term projects. He explained that a lack economic development is the biggest problem faced by people on the reservation. There simply are very few jobs, few stores and businesses, and few opportunities to bring jobs and businesses to Pine Ridge. The biggest help outsiders could provide is to bring jobs to the area. He mentioned that under Bush’s Faith Based Initiative, religious groups should be able to get government grants that could be used to bring services and jobs to Pine Ridge, but that no group that he was aware of had ever tried.

Someone also asked Denver about the significance of eagles in Lakota culture. He said that the eagle takes the prayers of the Lakota to the Great Spirit. I thought that was interesting.

Sunset Selfie

Sunset Selfie

That evening, after returning to the Next Step complex, we were treated to a thunderstorm. Thunderstorms on the Great Plains are awesome to watch, as long as you have a safe spot to watch from. God gave us an amazing light show! After our worship time, I showered, and went to sleep.

Thunderstorm

Thunderstorm

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